Evelyn Chartres Author

Kraft Dinner

Kraft Dinner seems to be a Canadian icon. This meal is often a favourite of children and often a survival tool for the starving university student. Quick and easy to make, it sometimes pays to have a few boxes handy in case you get inundated with children.

Ingredients

  • 8 ounce (225 g) box of Kraft Dinner
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of butter
  • ⅓ cup (80 ml) of milk

Preparation

  1. Boil 6 cups (1.4 litres) of water in a saucepan.
  2. Cook for 7 or 8 minutes or until tender.
  3. Drain and return to saucepan.
  4. Add butter, milk and cheese sauce mix to noodles.
  5. Ready-to-serve.

Lobster Melt

This dish that is said to have its origins in Nova Scotia’s South Shore, home of Acadians and several fishing communities. This recipe blends lobster with cream to create a delicious filling that can be served atop fresh tea biscuits or garlic bread. For an extra zing, add a bit of grated cheddar as a topping.

Ingredients

Lobster Melt

  • 5 ounces (140 ml) of cooked lobster meat
  • 3 tablespoons (45 g) of butter
  • ¼ cup (60 ml) of chopped fine onions
  • 2 tablespoons (30 g) of flour
  • ½ cup (120 ml) of milk
  • ½ cup (120 ml) of cream
  • ⅛ teaspoon (0.625 ml) of salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon (0.625 ml) of cayenne pepper

Tea Biscuits

  • 2 cups (470 ml) of all-purpose flour
  • 4 teaspoons (20 g) of baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon (5 g) of salt
  • ½ cup (120 ml) shortening
  • ¾ cup (180 ml) of milk

Preparation

Lobster Melt

  1. Dice lobster meat and set aside.
  2. In a medium saucepan melt butter on medium-high heat.  For an additional dose of flavour, substitute 1 tablespoon (15 g) of butter with garlic butter.
  3. Add onions and sauté for 1 minute.
  4. Add lobster and sauté for an additional 3 minutes.
  5. Mix in flour and stir until you have a consistent mixture.
  6. Add milk and cream and stir until sauce thickens.
  7. Add salt and pepper then stir.
  8. Can be in between two-halves of a fresh tea-biscuits. For that little extra top with cheese.

Tea Biscuits

  1. Pre-heat oven to 400°F (205°C).
  2. Add flour, baking powder and salt into a bowl.  Add shortening in cubes and mix.
  3. Add milk, mix and knead until you have a ball of dough.
  4. Roll out dough, and flatten to ¼ inch (0.6 cm).
  5. Cut into rounds using a cookie cutter or glass.  Place on a greased cookie sheet and allow to rest.
  6. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes.  Serve warm.

The End of the Thirteenth Cycle

Even Things That Go Bump in the Night Need a Place to Unwind

I have completed my thirteenth review of the Grand. This review resulted in a 15% decrease in corrections when compared to the twelfth cycle. Journey Through the River of Belief had the most substantial drop of 50%, while Old Soul increased by the same amount. Overall, there were 77 corrections which averages 5 changes per chapter.

About half the chapters saw a drop in changes during this cycle. Of note Penny Dreadful averaged of 4,292 words between corrections. Here is a summary for this cycle:

  • There was a 15% drop in corrections when compared to revision twelve;
  • 77 modifications for the entire work;
  • 5 modifications per chapter;
  • Journey Through the River of Belief had the most substantial drop at 50%;
  • Old Soul increased by 50%; and
  • Penny Dreadful averaged 4,292 words between corrections.

These revision took far less time than revisions prior to seven and for the following reasons:

  • It takes far less time to run through the material;
  • There are far fewer errors to find with an average of 1,209 words between corrections. This improves on the 819 words per change seen in revision twelve and is the first above a thousand; and
  • Changes implemented are minor in scope.

I expect to keep pushing through these revisions until the total amount of corrections drop well below 50 for the manuscript. So as it stands, I expect there is one revision left.

The End of the Twelfth Cycle

Even Things That Go Bump in the Night Need a Place to Unwind

I have completed my twelfth review of the Grand. This review resulted in a 40% decrease in corrections when compared to the eleventh cycle. Siamese Dreams had the most substantial drop of 64%, while Penny Dreadful had a 25% increase. Overall, there were 91 corrections which averages 6 changes per chapter.

About 94% of the chapters saw a drop in changes during this cycle. This is the first cycle where the amount of changes are less than one per percent and the Mad Hatter’s Mirror averaged of 1,423 words between corrections.

Here is a summary for this cycle:

  • There was a 40% drop in corrections when compared to revision eleven;
  • 91 modifications for the entire work, the first time changes are less than one per percent;
  • 6 modifications per chapter;
  • Siamese Dreams had the most substantial drop at 64%;
  • Penny Dreadful increased by 25%; and
  • The Mad Hatter’s Mirror averaged 1,423 words between corrections.

These revision took far less time than revisions prior to seven and for the following reasons:

  • It takes far less time to run through the material;
  • There are far fewer errors to find with an average of 819 words between corrections. This improves on the 520 words per change seen in revision eleven; and
  • Changes implemented are minor in scope.

I expect to keep pushing through these revisions until the total amount of corrections drop well below 50 for the manuscript. Since there was no change from the previous revision, I expect there are 2 revisions left.

Wealthy Older People are More Likely to Pirate Ebooks

The general perception about pirating is done by younger people. The idea being is that they do not have the means to afford the content. This population group tends to be more attuned to technology and has more time to go through the trouble of pirating it.

A recent study with results shown on torrentfreak.com seems to break that wide open:

  • 47% of those who pirate eBooks are within the 30-44 year old bracket;
  • 70% have post secondary; and
  • 65% make over 60,000$ a year.

In other words, people who are most likely capable of paying for an eBook are those who pirate it.

Now they also state that roughly 25% of pirating is essentially swapping books with friends. This could be a carry over from the print world, were friends/family would often swap books instead of each buying their own copy.

While this article does not talk about, the age bracket may have something to do with people getting older. In the 2000s a lot of people were pirating games, music and other content because they could not afford it. Now they are older and have enough money to afford buying the content, however the habit is ingrained. Its seen as a norm with no ethical or moral ramifications attached to it.