Evelyn Chartres Author
Evelyn Chartres – Page 60 – Author (Nom de Plume)

Pâté Chinois a l’Aile

Garlic Shepherds Pie

Pâté chinois is a French Canadian dish similar to Shepherd’s Pie. It is made from layered ground beef, canned cream corn, and mashed potatoes on top.  This recipe is a variation that infuses the dish with garlic, you can vary the amount of garlic in the dish if you prefer a more subtle effect.

Pâté chinois is not Chinese cuisine. One theory is that dish was introduced to railway workers by Chinese cooks while building the railroad.

Ingredients

Ground Beef Layer

  • 1 pound (450g) of lean ground beef
  • 1 tablespoon (15g) of butter
  • 1 small onion (50g) chopped
  • 3 to 6 cloves of garlic (5 – 10g) pressed
  • ½ teaspoon of Italian seasoning
  • ½ teaspoon of pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon of salt

Corn Layer

  • 19 fl oz (540 ml) of cream-style corn

Potato Mash

  • 1 pound (450g) of potatoes
  • 1-2 tablespoons (15 – 30g) of garlic butter
  • ¼ cup (60ml) of milk

Preparation

  1. Pre-heat oven to 325°F (165°C).
  2. Melt butter in a pan then place ground beef, onion, garlic, Italian seasoning, salt and pepper. Cook on medium-high until the meat is golden brown.  Drain meat then layer on the bottom of a baking dish, pack it down lightly until layer is uniform.
  3. Pour cream corn into baking dish, cover ground beef layer uniformly.  Be sure to leave a few tablespoons of cream corn for later.
  4. Peel and chop potatoes, then boil until they  break apart by pressing against the side of the pot.
  5. Drain water then add garlic butter and milk.  Mash until you have a smooth mixture.  Spoon mashed potatoes into the baking dish, adding the third and final layer to the dish.
  6. Use remaining cream corn to cover the mashed potatoes.  This will prevent the potatoes from drying up in the oven.
  7. Place in the oven for 25 to 30 minutes to heat up concerts.  Comes out ready to serve.

Revising the Mad Hatter’s Mirror

The_Grand_Bravo_Series

The Mad Hatter’s Mirror available on:
Google Docs
Wattpad

I have completed my second review of The Mad Hatter’s Mirror. A story which focuses on a young man involved a traumatic event then explores the effects it had on his psyche.

There were 336 modifications made to this 10 page chapter. Overall, this revision concentrated on improving the chapter’s readability. Several modifications were related to formatting and maintaining consistency.

Both Google Docs and Wattpad have the revised edition. Note that the Google Docs version permits comments and revisions, feel free to make use of this capability.

Pouding Chômeur

Pogey Pudding

Pogey-PuddingPouding Chômeur is said to be a French Canadian dessert introduced during the Great Depression.  This dish is easy to make, requires few ingredients, and suits those with a sweet tooth and is excellent when served with a portion of vanilla ice cream.

Ingredients

Syrup

  • 1 cup (235 ml) of brown sugar
  • 1 cup (235 ml) of water
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) of butter

Pudding

  • ¾ cup (180 ml) of brown sugar
  • ½ cup (120 ml) of milk
  • ½ teaspoon (2.5 ml) of vanilla extract
  • 1 cup (235 ml) of all-purpose flour
  • ¼ teaspoon (1.25 ml) of salt
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) of baking powder

Preparation

  1. Pre-heat oven to 375°F (190°C).
  2. In a pot mix water, brown sugar, and butter then set heat to medium-high.  Stir on occasion until syrup comes to a boil.
  3. Concurrently, mix in a bowl the ingredients for the pudding until you have a smooth consistency.  If the pudding mix does not pour, add in a bit of milk.
  4. Once syrup boils, pour contents of the bowl in slowly. Pudding should float over the syrup base, so spread out to even out the pudding.
  5. Heat for 15 to 20 minutes in oven until the pudding is well cooked.  Poke the pudding with a toothpick to check if ready; when toothpick comes out out clean,  pudding is cooked.

Revising the Cheshire Cat’s Grin

The Grand Bravo Series

The Cheshire Cat’s Grin available on:
Google Docs
Wattpad

I have completed my second review of The Cheshire Cat’s Grin. A story which the focuses on a young flapper who falls for the wrong man.

There were 188 modifications made to this 5 page chapter. Overall, this revision concentrated on improving the chapter’s readability. Several modifications were related to formatting and maintaining consistency.

Both Google Docs and Wattpad display the revised edition. Note that the Google Docs version permits comments and revisions, feel free to make use of this capability.

Stop the Presses!

During the past few years, when not otherwise occupied,I have been catching up on the classics.  Some of these have included 1984, Les Trois Mousquetaires and Frankenstein.

One lovely word discovered too late to prevent some serious hair pulling!

Lacking from this collection of literature was the presence of any Canadian classics.  Hence, for the first time since university I took it upon myself to catch up on some Canadiana.

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Young girl hiding behind baggage at a train station

Enter Anne of Green Gables and Anne of Avonlea, part of a series which I am reading while I review The Grand Project.  These books have inspired generations of readers, exported Canadian culture to the Land of the Rising Sun and reminded resistance fighters of what they were fighting for.

So why had I missed the bandwagon before now?  Even after I paid a visit to Prince Edward Island? Who knows! However, I feel that having a child now allows me to appreciate the stories.

I must confess however that I now wish I had read these books earlier.  Perhaps I may not have been ready for them or been appreciated the works, but it would have certainly introduced me to a very special word: Moonglade.

I came across this word while reading the Anne of Avonlea and may not have noticed had Lucy Maud Montgomery not decided to make a character explicitly define the word.  It describes the shimmering path of silvery light that is reflected off the moon onto a body of  water.

One lovely word discovered too late to prevent some serious hair pulling when describing a scene from The Portrait!  To think that word was just waiting for me, and all it needed was to pick-up the right set of Canadian classics.

I will probably make a point of it to use that world in future literature.  A shame that The Grand is nestled in the mountains!